Friday, 22 August 2014

Edinburgh Festival Fringe Theatre 2014 Theatre Reviews 14 - Every Brilliant Thing / Bill Clinton Hercules / The Initiate

Every Brilliant Thing
Summerhall
Four stars
How life-affirming can you get about suicide? If that’s not an easy
question to answer, try asking the hero of Duncan Macmillan's solo
play, who probably has it filed away in his list of great things in
life that keep you going. The motivation for this was when his mother
attempted suicide and he began a list to help remind her of why she
should be alive. As performer Jonny Donahoe leads us through all the
love, loss and messy twists and turns of our hero's own life, his
ever-lengthening list becomes part diary, part totem of survival.

Goethe and Daniel Johnson all make an appearance by way of the
meticulously numbered epigrams that come to life when Donahoe asks the
audience to recount them throughout the course of George Perrin's
production for Paines Plough. The audience too become assorted key
players in the unfolding drama as they go willingly onstage in what may
be the gentlest form of audience participation ever. This is largely
down to Donahoe's skill as the jolliest of hosts in what, despite its
starting point, is one of the loveliest shows of the year.
Until August 24th

Bill Clinton Hercules
Assembly
Four stars
“You don't want to be hero-worshipped by me,” says the former President
of the United States at one point in Racheal Mariner's solo play cum
TED talk. “It guarantees you an assassins bullet.” Bill Clinton is
talking about pressing the flesh with JFK and hanging on every
inspirational word of Martin Luther King before both men were gunned
down out of history.; He doesn't make such an observation with
sombreness, but, as played by Bob Paisley, with a positive spring in
his step.

This sets the general tone for an insightful portrait of the
jazz-loving hippy whose flight into the establishment was only
inevitable if you pay heed to the classical yarns of Odysseus and
Hercules which he treats mores as a lifestyle choice than literature.
Kosovo, the Arab Spring, Lewinskygate and his later playing second sax
to Hillary are all in the mix in the sort of speech that Tony Blair
would kill for.

Despite its factual root, Mariner's script lifts things beyond dull
political biography to a sort of
self-deprecating poetry, replete deadly one-liners delivered by Paisley
with aplomb in Guy Masterson's production. Speaking out in support of
the Occupy movement, this is the one-time Slick Willy as born-again
radical, a wannabe hero who only ever wanted to be one of the good guys.
Until August 24.

The Initiate
Summerhall
Four stars
Life is just one long series of negotiations for the Somalian mini-cab
driver at the heart of Alexandra Wood's punchy new thriller, that
twists and turns its way around the back-alleys of the psyche as a
driver taking the 'scenic' route around London might. This is the
trouble. There's not enough wide-open spaces, everyone is in too much
of a hurry and, above all, there simply isn't enough money to make it
big in multicultural London. When the cab driver's son son is teased
about Somalian pirates kidnapping a local couple, some kind of meaning
beyond being an invisible migrant.

One of several presentations of new work held in Paines Plough's new
Roundabout venue housed in the grounds of Summerhall, Wood's play is an
intricately woven thriller, in which the driver navigates his way
through his home life with wife and child, to his country-men and the
hostages he becomes a go-between for. With a trio of performances  from
Andrew French, Sian Reese-Williams and Abdul Salis that fizz and
crackle their way through George Perrin's production, Wood's prime-time
narrative simmers with a tension that says something quietly profound
about the complexities of cultural roots in twenty-first century
Britain.
Until August 24th

The Herald, August 22nd

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Edinburgh Festival Fringe 2014 Theatre Reviews 13 - No Guts, No Heart, No Glory / The Trial of Jane Fonda / Sirens

No Guts, No Heart, No Glory
Sandy's Boxing Gym
Four stars
Not a punch is thrown in anger in the Common Wealth company's follow-up
to Our Glass House,
one of the sleeper hits of last year's Fringe. In its real-life
show-and-tell played out by a determined quintet of young female Muslim
boxers, however, this new piece's depiction of young women empowering
themselves enough to find a voice beyond their backgrounds is
inspirational.

Taking place in Sandy's Gym housed in a community centre in
Craigmillar, director Evie Manning and writer Aisha Zia have
choreographed a criss-crossing confessional that moves from a training
session with punchbag and skipping ropes to climbing in the ring and
declaiming like champions. On one level, the young womens' concerns –
about themselves, their families and the world that would rather define
them in other ways while behaving crazily to each other – are the stuff
of any teenage rites of passage. In the context of their race, religion
and what must have been a huge set of decisions to jump in the ring, No
Guts, No Heart, No Glory transcends that to become an irresistible
things about muscle, guts and the determination to stand up for who you
are in an increasingly mad world.
Until August 25

The Trial of Jane Fonda
Assembly Rooms
Three stars
When movie starlet turned political activist turned up in the
Connecticut town of Waterbury in 1988 to film her new movie, Stanley
and Iris, in 1988, in a town with an especially high population of
Vietnam war veterans, she was forced to face up to her past in a way
she didn't expect. This is the backdrop for Terry Jastrow's new play,
which reimagines a off-limits event in which Fonda met the ex-soldiers
boycotting her presence in town in a local church hall.

As a vehicle for another Hollywood icon, Anne Archer, Jastrow's
production of her own script lines up the arguments that Fonda was a
traitor who allowed herself to be filmed on a Vietnamese gun positioned
to shoot down American forces. On one level, this is an an entire
period of American history on trial, in which a young, wealthy and
often famous counter-cultural elite flirted with a  radical chic that
came back on them and sometimes bit them hard. As Fonda argues her
case, however, Jastrow's at times overly sentimental premise suggests
that Fonda might actually have stopped the war.

Whatever the truth of this, and while Archer is no Fonda, the archive
footage – of Fonda, of soldiers in the field who committed war crimes,
and of the politicians who sent them there – points up an at times
fascinating insight into a vital era of late twentieth century history
that went beyond he big  screen.
Until August 24.

Sirens
Summerhall
Four stars
Six women step onstage in formal evening gowns and place their
manuscripts on a series of lecterns in front of them. The formality of
such an opening might suggest a choral recital of politesse and
restraint. What follows over the next hour of Belgian company
Ontroerend Goed's latest confessional dissection of human behaviour,
however, is a provocative litany of self-determination and power, in
which all the everyday abuses inflicted on women are thrown back in our
faces in a strictly personal fashion. This is no harangue, however. The
performers strike a pose, ach first-hand experience delivered with a
raging calm. The keening chorale that accompanies the hardcore porn
being projected behind the performers ends up as the wittiest of
soundtracks.

In form and delivery, Alexandra Devriendt's production resembles a
spikier, less self-congratulatory Vagina Monologues that goes further,
the performers looking the audience in the eye as they draw strength
from their words. It's an intimate aesthetic which Devriendt and
Ontroerend Goed have applied elsewhere. Here, however, the elegant
simplicity of its presentation becomes an unnerving but all too
necessary show of strength.
Until August 24th.

The Herald, August 22nd 2014


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Edinburgh Festival Fringe 2014 Theatre Reviews 12 – Traverse Breakfast Plays 2 - Fat Alice / Mother Ease / Walter

Fat Alice
Traverse Theatre
Three stars
When the crack that appears in the ceiling of a woman who's been
conducting a ten-year affair with a married man threatens to turn into
something bigger, it becomes a metaphor for how easy it is for  entire
worlds to come crashing down if you allow them to run to seed. Issues
of body image, fear of commitment and the willingness to acquiesce to
others all rear their chocolate-fuelled head in Alison Carr's absurdist
tragicomedy, the fourth play in the mini season of Traverse Breakfast
Plays directed by Traverse associate director Emma Callander as
script-in-hand work-in-progress productions.

There are contemporary shades of Ionesco in the audacious largesse of
Carr's script, which would make a wonderful radio piece while offering
some potentially tantalising technical and design choices for any
future full stage production. As it stands, Keith Fleming and Meg
Fraser spar furiously in a domestic tug of war where comfort eating can
bring the house down with big-toed abandon.
Repeated August 22.

Mother Ease
Traverse Theatre
Three stars
Angela and Fiona have very different ideas about child-care. Yet
somehow the pair have ended up together in Angela's high-rise flat,
with Fiona seemingly there to offer guidance on how Fiona should be
raising her new baby, Aidan. At the opposite ends of the social
spectrum, the two women don't exactly bond, but form a brittle alliance
of need, especially inn the face of Jim, the father of Angela's other
child. It is when the two women enter the house of Marie, however,
where the full tragic consequences of an entire class being allowed to
slip through the cracks of an already broken system are tragically
brought home.

After five days of Traverse Breakfast Plays, Molly Innes' new play is a
devastating thing to wake up to. Unremittingly bleak, it is a forensic
dramatic dissection of a part of society we only ever hear about when
things go wrong. When it is Fiona rather than Angela who finds
something to believe in with Jim at the play's end, it is all too
telling of how broken things have become in a damning and fearlessly
serious affair.
Repeated August 23.

Walter
Traverse Theatre
Three stars
Growing old disgracefully was never on the cards for Gloria, the woman
on the verge of something or other in Lachlan Philpott's magnificent
rom-com with a twist that forms the final selection of this year's
Traverse Breakfast Plays Season. When Gloria's sister Sheena sets her
up on a blind date at the zoo, she meets Walter, who's not her type,
but who she ends up dating anyway. It is a very different kind of wild
life, however, that she ends up discovering with Walter and his foxy
friends.

This is quirkily off-kilter as it gets as Philpott explores the odder
side of the dating and mating game through an eye-poppingly strange set
of characters. With Andy Clark suitably goofy in the title role, Meg
Fraser once again steals the show in a delightfully deadpan portrayal
of Gloria that proves to be one of the highlights of the entire season.
Repeated August 24.

The Herald, August 22nd 2014

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Edinburgh Festival Fringe 2014 Theatre Reviews 11 - Theatre Uncut

Traverse Theatre
Four stars
Revolutions don't often start on Monday mornings. For the last three
Mondays, however, Theatre Uncut has suggested otherwise in a series of
lo-fi presentations of relatively hot-off-the-press bite-size playlets
in response to burning issues of the moment. Founded in 2010 by
directors Emma Callander and Hannah Price as an open access style
operation in response to the Westminster government's cut-driven
austerity culture, Theatre Uncut has become an annual fixture of the
Traverse bar, where their three programmes were presented as
script-in-had works in progress.

This year's first session featured five new works, including Anders
Lustgarten's The Finger of God, which sees what happens when the
National Lottery is sexed up to extreme proportions, and Inua Ellams
This is Us, in which direct action against the bedroom tax is the only
solution. It is a timely co-opting of someone else's words that made
Hayley Squires' piece, Ira Provitt and the Man, so special, closing as
it did with Charlie Chaplin's rousing plea for humanity and justice in
his film, The Great Dictator. It is a powerful and increasingly
pertinent way to close.

The forthcoming Scottish referendum has been pretty hard to avoid on
this year's Fringe, and Theatre Uncut's response came in the form of
six very different plays. The absurdity of Lewis Hetherington's The
White Lightning and the Black Stag, in which a woman is questioned
exactly how Scottish she feels, is heightened even more in AJ
Taudevin's The 12.57.  Here border guards in Berwick upon Tweed keep an
eye on the trains with an increasing pointlessness.

Davy Anderson's two monologues see the referendum through the cynical
non-voters who will decide the referendum's result, Kieran Hurley's
Close is its weary hangover, and Rob Drummond's Party Pieces asks who,
given the chance, will sing up in their own voice.

The final Theatre Uncut programme featured work by writers from Turkey
and Scotland responding to the wave of protests in and around
Istanbul's Gezi Park. Performed by actors from the Turkish theatre
company, DOT Tiyatro alongside Theatre Uncut regulars, the programme
looked at how young people can be politicised by police brutality, how
news of the protest is disseminated, and the very real threat of
dissent being crushed without discrimination. This is a powerful
insight into a situation rarely heard about in any form on these
shores, and is perhaps the most telling example of why Theatre Uncut
remains such a vital platform.

The Herald, August 21st 2014


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Edinburgh Festival Fringe 2014 Theatre Reviews 10 - Spine / A Walk At The Edge of the World / 13 Sunken Years

Spine
Underbelly
Five stars
When teenage Amy turns up on the doorstep of an old woman with the
promise of a room, she opens up the door into a brand new world.  Amy
may be chock-full of attitude, but the old woman is no pushover, as she
reveals to Amy when she reveals her own attitude founded on old-time
Socialism. This is something she put into practice following the
enforced closure of her local library, when she and her neighbours
liberated all the books.

Originally presented as a twenty-minute version in 2012 as part of the
Theatre Uncut initiative's hot off the press responses to austerity
culture, this hour-long development remains  as touching and as urgent
as it ever was. Surrounded by shelf-loads of hard-back tomes, Rosie
Wyatt gives a ferocious performance as Amy as she charts her accidental
getting of wisdom and the call to arms for people power in action that
follows.

Where the old lady we never see represents the wisdom, decency and
compassion that is being all but wiped out by wilful ignorance and
greed, Amy is one of a generation who could flourish if they were only
offered something other than nothing. Brennan, Wyatt and director
Bethany Pitts have together produced a vital piece of theatre about the
the right to knowledge and the power of community in the face of access
to both being annexed by the over-privileged few. It is also a
heart-wrenchingly beautiful modern classic of hard times.
Until August 24.

A Walk At The Edge of the World
Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art
Four stars
You could be forgiven for feeling like you were deep in the countryside
for the first half of the Magnetic North company's exploration of
wide-open spaces by way of body, mind and free-thinking soul. It begins
in the gallery gardens, in which performer Ian Cameron casually
declares his intentions of leading us on a brief city stroll, pleading
too for silence as we go.

As Cameron leads us on a round trip through the neighbourhood's secret
gardens, the sights, sounds and smells – of traffic roar, water
ripples, buzz of life – such low-key displacement heightens the senses
in something that is not so much a retreat as a quiet coming to terms
with the world.

Back in the SNFoMA's studio space, Cameron gives us what he describes
as a talk, which comes complete with what appears to be an archive
slide-show of real-life times past. Accompanied by forensically sourced
visuals by the Sans facon design team of Tristan Surtees and Charles
Blanc, what follows in Cameron's engagingly low-key delivery is part
meditation, part psycho-geographical derive, and part philosophical
inquiry of some very personal effects. Nicholas Bone's production of
his own script is a carefully constructed dramatic affirmation of the
transcendental power of putting one foot in front of the other.
Until August 24.

13 Sunken Years
Assembly Rooms
Three stars
When thirteen year old Eva's vivacious and free-spirited mother,
Helena, drives off one day and never comes back, Eva is left in the
care of her granny, Ursula. With Ursula becoming increasingly engulfed
by dementia, Eva must learn to grow up pretty fast, even as she must
face up to the mysteries of the river that flows beside her village. As
she moves into womanhood, the loss of Eva's mother looks set to linger
forever.

Ushered in by Susan Appelbe's folksy score, Paula Salminen's play, as
translated by Eva Buchwald dovetails back and forth between time
periods, as Eva's friends grow up and move away, with the figure of the
canal lock-keeper a constant presence. Set on an array of wooden
platforms, Maria Oller's co-production between the Lung Ha's and
Stellar Quines theatre companies in association with the Finnish
National Theatre is laced with a simmering sense of grown-up mystery.
Nicola Tuxworth gives a nuanced central performance as Eva in a rites
of passage that charts three generations of women and their responses
to the world.
Until August 24.

The Herald, August 21st 2014


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Wednesday, 20 August 2014

Theatre Thalia - Front

When Belgian theatre director Luk Perceval decided he wanted to live
and work in Germany, his parents apparently warned him against such a
move. The Germans killed their countrymen, they said, so why would he
possibly want to live there?

This is what the director whose last work to be seen in Edinburgh was
his 2004 production of Andromache told Christina Bellingen, the
dramaturg of the Thalia Theatre, Hamburg, anyway. Bellingen worked
closely with Perceval on Front, an epic, multi-lingual spoken-word
polyphony brought to Edinburgh International Festival this week in a
co-production between the Thalia and NTGent from Belgium.

Front is based in part on All Quiet on the Western Front, Erich Maria
Remarque's novel published in 1929, which sold more than two and a half
million copies in twenty-two different languages over eighteen months.
Remarque's book, which was filmed twice in 1930 and 1979, was also
burnt by the Nazis when they came to power. Front also draws from Under
Fire, written in 1916 by Henri Barbusse while still a soldier fighting
the war he went on to chronicle. These are put together with
contemporary accounts of life during wartime and related in a mixture
of German, French, Flemish and English.

“We are showing the war from these four different perspectives,”
Bellingen explains. “There are soldiers on either side speaking German,
French or Flemish, and we have a nurse from Great Britain getting in
touch with a wounded soldier from Belgium. But we're not playing war
onstage. You won't find guns going off or anything like that, and the
actors aren't in uniform. They wear suits like they're sitting in the
dining room of the Titanic as it sinks”

During the performance, which opened in Hamburg earlier this year,
projections of young soldiers illustrate the criss-crossing testimonies
spoken by the actors.

“It is done out of respect,” says Bellingen, “to get the voice of the
people. The actors are the voices of the unknown soldiers. You can
never really imagine what it was like to be there as a nineteen year
old boy, and here you hear all these different voices of war, so it
becomes like a symphony, like a requiem. We wanted to do it like a
concert, with variations on a theme of war and being in a war. It was
not the point to follow a character on stage from beginning to end.
It's about where we find liberation from other countries. With everyone
talking, no-one knows who they're talking about. It was the same
experience for these young men whichever country they came from.”

In this way, Front is more of a dramatic collage than a play per se.
Crucial to its creation alongside Perceval, Bellingen and Flemish
dramaturg, Steven Heene, was composer Ferdinand Forsch, a German
percussionist and sculptor who has crafted instruments out of scrap
metal sourced at junkyards. In Front, Forsch evokes the cacophony of
battle using metal sheets in a way German industrial band Einsturzende
Neubaten might.

“He is a sound artist,” Bellingen points out, “so the sound produced on
the stage from steel and metal adds another layer to the collage.”

One of the things Front's trio of adaptors discovered during their
initial researches was the lack of written-down Belgian experiences of
the great war.

“The war took place in Belgium,” she says, “but we did not find so much
Flemish war literature. It was an occupied country, and Gent is forty
miles from the front. There's a museum, and they rebuilt the trenches
there. You can see the craters in the landscape where the bombs
dropped, and where thousands of people died. It's amazing to see how
much World War One was a part of people's daily lives. There were forty
thousand dead in Belgium, but there were not so many Belgian soldiers
fighting.

“World War One didn't take place in Germany, where World War Two and
the Holocaust are obviously still really important, but before this
year, World War One wasn't so much forgotten as never really talked
about. People do remember it, and I think that wherever you are, we
have a real duty to remember the horrors of World War One.”

The response to Front since it premiered in Hamburg in March of this
year has been suitably humbled.

“I think people were really touched,” says Bellingen. “Sometimes you
can be playing to a thousand people, and it doesn't matter what is
going on onstage, there is always someone coughing, but when we first
did Front, it was really like being in church.”

While there is a clear sensitivity in Germany about any work of art
that deals with war, there is no sense in Front of Perceval's vision
falling down on one side or the other.

“It is about the horror of war, says Bellingen. “In our play, there is
no talking about good or bad sides. It is about young men who spent
eighteen months in the mud, and how wars are still going on. You can
never say that enough.”

Front, Royal Lyceum Theatre, August 22-26, 7-10.30pm
www.eif.co.uk

The Herald, August 20th 2014


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Stan Douglas - Helen Lawrence

There's something oddly off-kilter about Stan Douglas being
photographed in an ornate, low-lit and state-of-art room in the Haus
der Kunst, Munich, where his new exhibition, Mise en Scene, has just
opened. For the past hour, the Vancouver-born artist, film-maker and
photographer, whose large-scale piece of cinematic theatre, Helen
Lawrence, opens as part of Edinburgh International Festival, has been
taking part in a panel discussion to talk about the series of
elaborately constructed fictions contained in the exhibition.

Taken from real life historical events, the assorted images of staged
streets scenes, 1950s nightclub portraits and post-revolutionary 1970s
hedonism may be steeped in meticulously realised retro imagery culled
from film noir and pulp fiction, but they are quietly and deeply
political in intent. Which is why Douglas appears as off-kilter as the
shadowy 3D image at the far end of the long room where much of the
exhibition is housed, and which reimagines the now razed Hogan's Alley
in 1948 Vancouver as a ramshackle set for a post-war film noir which
Helen Lawrence effectively is.

While his fellow panellists are dressed in standard issue European arts
mandarin black suits, Douglas sports a dressed down checked shirt,
which, given the themes of Helen Lawrence, makes it clear where his
loyalties lie. As does the show itself, which is performed later the
same night at the  Munich Kammerspiele's studio space, around the
corner from the main theatre, and just off the main drag of the city's
well-heeled centre.

In stark contrast to all this, Helen Lawrence switches between Hogan's
Alley – the local name for Park Lane in Vancouver's Strathcona district
-  where the black community live, and the run-down hotel occupied by
war veterans left on the skids once the war ended. Into these
highly-strung environments run on a black-market economy steps a
mysterious femme fatale catching up with her past. Onstage, Douglas'
story, scripted by HBO writer Chris Haddock, who has penned episodes of
Boardwalk Empire, is conveyed by actors performing on an empty stage
who are in turn filmed by other actors not in that scene. With a
low-key jazz underscore setting the tone, a live black and white video
feed of the performance is projected onto a huge screen against
computer generated backdrops, with every wide-eyed, tight-lipped
gesture exposed.

It is effects like this that prompted one of Douglas' black-suited
colleagues to earlier describe him as “a wizard of location.”

Douglas spoke plainer.

“Every performance is like the actors are making a movie live every
night,” he said. “Twice on Sundays.”

To explain the dual nature of Helen Lawrence, Douglas went on to quote
Canadian-born classical pianist, Glenn Gould, who, when talking of his
own charged relationship with playing, performing and recording, spoke
of how importance it was “to be aware of the illusion, but to be able
to see the physicality going on.”

Douglas, whose artworks over the last thirty years have frequently
looked at the failed utopias of late twentieth century urban renewal,
also talks of “the social structure of a downtown bar.”

This is an idea the real inhabitants of Hogan's Alley might have
recognised. Like any ethnically diverse neighbourhoods that existed in
a world before cultural quarters, Hogan's Alley was also a melting pot
of underground artistic activity, where the likes of Duke Ellington
stayed when on tour.

The next day, over breakfast in the dining room of the hotel where he
is staying in Munich, Douglas considers the political motivations and
considerations behind Helen Lawrence, which began its road to stage and
screen in 2008.

“George W Bush was coming to the end of his time in power,” Douglas
explains, “and I thought that would be the end of the war on terror,
and I was curious about what a post-war period was like, both then, in
Vancouver after the Second World War, and now, with what I thought was
the end of the war on terror. Unfortunately the war on terror didn't
actually end in the way I thought it might,  and there was no real new
situation, but there were still parallels. There was a recession back
then, and there's a recession now. The world banking system was a
shambles then and it's a shambles now. There was a housing crisis then,
and there's a housing crisis now. Also, the Cold War was beginning
then, with what was seen by the west as a shadowy sort of communism,
and now there's a shadowy form of terrorism as seen by the west.

“The parallels were there, but the transition to stability didn't
really happen in the post-war period, and the solution  to the economic
challenges then were to invent consumerism, so people who worked could
buy the stuff they made, but this time they built the banks up, so I'm
not sure that bodes too well for the future.”

In this respect, Helen Lawrence represents a society in flux, where old
communities were clinging on by their fingertips to the bricks and
mortar that would eventually be swept away by a form of urban
regeneration and social engineering designed for the wealthy.

“I guess I try to look at things that are very abstract and very
political,” says Douglas, “and things that affect the world as well as
affect individuals on a personal level. So all we have to experience in
the play are these individual lives, and the challenges of these people
who are living through these crises. You live it through them to a
certain degree.

“The whole urban renewal thing changed things. Ethnic slums in urban
centres were cleared out, warehousing for the poor was built, there was
new housing in the suburbs for the middle classes, freeways were built.
It was about normalising things again. During the war a blind eye was
turned to gambling and prostitution, and you have a very different set
of morals. The question for me was how do you go from a war situation
to peace-time with a new set of morals? Sadly, we haven't seen that
yet.”

As with the best movies, the end of Helen Lawrence is open-ended enough
to leave room for a sequel. As with even better movies, it may be best
to leave well alone. Either way, the 3D image of Hogan's Alley, 1948
that graced Mise en scene in Munich will form part of an exhibition by
Douglas at the Fruitmarket Gallery in Edinburgh this coming November.
Also on show will be Der Sandmann, Douglas' 1995 split-screen piece
which charts a post-war urban garden in Germany's transition into a
building site.

As for Douglas, he has a plane to catch, and, after breakfast, stands
waiting outside his hotel for a cab to take him to the airport. On the
corner, with his luggage beside him, he takes shelter from the
mid-morning rain that's just started to fall, pulling his collar up
close as he goes. The cab pulls up and Douglas puts his luggage in the
boot, steps inside the back seat, and slams the door behind him. The
cab slowly drives away, turns the corner, and he's gone. If this were
night-time, a saxophone would be playing.

Helen Lawrence, King's Theatre, Edinburgh, Aug 24-26, 8-9.30pm; Aug 25,
3-4.30pm. Stan Douglas, Fruitmarket Gallery, Edinburgh, November
7-February 15 2015.
www.eif.co.uk

The Herald, August 19th 2014




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