Tuesday, 28 October 2014

Dominic Hill - The Citizens Theatre's Spring 2015 70th Anniversary Season

When the Citizens Theatre in Glasgow announced earlier this year that
the centrepiece of the theatre's  seventieth anniversary Spring season
in 2015 would be a new production of John Byrne's play, The Slab Boys,
it confirmed excited whispers which had been circulating for some time.
The Slab Boys, after all, has become a bona fide modern classic since
it premiered at the Traverse Theatre in Edinburgh in 1978.

The fact that it will be directed by David Hayman, who had directed the
original production of the play that redefined Scottish theatre
thirty-six years ago gave the news an extra frisson. After blazing a
trail as part of the legendary 1970s Citz ensemble, The Slab Boys will
be Hayman's second return to his theatrical alma mater under its
current artistic director Dominic Hill's tenure, following his
barn-storming turn in the title role of Hill's production of King Lear.

Today's exclusive announcement in the Herald confirms that the
remainder of the Citz's Spring 2015  season looks set to be equally
special.

“We wanted to do work that was close to home,” Hill explains. “John and
David have been talking to me about doing it here for some time. It
feels like the right theatre to do it, and a nice celebratory way to
start the year.”

The second major Citizens production will be a new play by Douglas
Maxwell. Fever Dream: Southside is a Glasgow-set study of life in
Govanhill during a heatwave. With a clear umbilical link between the
comedy of truth that fires both Byrne and Maxwell's work down the
generations, Fever Dream: Southside will also mark a production of
Maxwell's first big play since If Destroyed True several years back.

“It's a play about fatherhood,” says Hill, “and focuses on the fears of
new parents brining up a child in a city. The play has this almost
Johnsonian sense of larger than life characters in a community, and is
kind of a play about home and people's need for beliefs. There's this
entire community of characters written in these wonderful bright
colours that Douglas brings to his work. Douglas isn't afraid to be
funny, and there's a real vitality to his work, but there's real
integrity to it as well.”

There are even more links to the ghosts of Citizens past in the
company's third in-house production. Into That Darkness is Robert David
Macdonald's stage adaptation of a book by historian Gitta Sereny, in
which she interviewed Franz Stangl, the extermination camp commandant
who was finally convicted for the murder of more than one million
people in Nazi extermination camps in 1970.

“I read the book years ago,” says Hill, “and thought then that it would
make a great piece of theatre. Then when I came here I found out that
Robert David Macdonald had done it, so it seemed a real opportunity to
have another look at it.”

The new main-stage production will be directed by Gareth Nicholls,
currently the Citz's Main Stage Director in Residence, a post shared
between the Citizens and Stewart Laing's Untitled Projects, and
supported by Creative Scotland's Creative Futures Programme and the
Jerwood Charitable Foundation. Into That Darkness will be Nicholls's
first main-stage show after assisting Hill on Hamlet.

In terms of visiting companies, Hill's programme continues to forge
links with companies who have now become Citizens regulars as well as
fostering brand new alliances. The season will open with what looks set
to be a fascinating production of Macbeth by the ever adventurous
Filter Theatre, while in March, Headlong return with a brand new look
at David Hare's 1993 play, The Absence of War, which looks at a
charismatic Labour Party leader's attempts to be elected into power.

“I like the idea that we connect with companies,” Hill says, “and for
audiences to develop a relationship with them. I wanted to see Filter
doing something more serious, and the resonances of The Absence of War
in the run-up to the UK General Election and everything that's going on
in the Labour Party are huge.”

Absence of War will be followed by Lippy, Bush Moukarzel's play for
Ireland's Dead Centre company, which was a hit in this year's Edinburgh
Festival Fringe, where it was given a Herald Angel award. Lippy will
form part of the off-site programme of the Arches 2015 Behaviour
festival, and will be the first time the two very different venues have
collaborated.

“The response to that show in Edinburgh was so huge,” says Hill, “that
I thought it was important that it was seen on this side of the
country. The opportunity to work with the Arches as well is really
interesting, and may open up the Citizens to a different kind of
audience.”

Beyond Spring 2015, the Citizens team are also busy fund-raising for
the multimillion pound Capital Project, which will see a major
refurbishment of the theatre and its facilities. With a projected £16
million budget needing to be sourced, a healthy £11.4 million has
already been secured from a mix of Heritage Lottery Fund (£4.9
million), Glasgow City Council (£4 million), Creative Scotland (£1.5
million) and £500,000 apiece from Historic Scotland and the Robertson
Trust.

While the Capital Project might appear to be well on track to fruition,
Hill can't afford to become complacent, especially with tomorrow's
announcement by Creative Scotland which will outline which arts bodies
will receive subsidy from their Regular Funding scheme. Given a track
record which last weekend saw the Citizens win an Arts and Business
award for their Commonwealth programme this year, it seems unlikely
that the Gorbals-based institution will lose out in any major way, but
Hill isn't taking anything for granted.

“Like most organisations,” he says, “the Citizens is looking for an in
increase in what we normally get from Creative Scotland, but they've
already said that there has been more money applied for than there is
available. I can't second-guess what the decision might be, but while
we're very good at managing to make as much work as we can with what
we've got, like everyone else we're at the very edge of our finances.
One thing we've tried to do at the Citz is increase the amount of our
own work that goes on, and standstill funding or a cut especially would
make that very hard to sustain.”

Tickets for all shows in the Citizens Theatre's Spring 2015 season go
on sale from today.
www.citz.co.uk

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The Citz Spring 2015 – At A Glance
Macbeth – January 20-31
Shakespeare's Scottish play has been done in a myriad of way, with
several great productions seen on the Citz stage. Filter Theatre have
become masters of reinventing the classics, and follow up their
production of Twelfth Night with a version of Macbeth that fuses the
play with an innovative soundscape.

The Garden – January 22-24
The Citizens Circle studio opens up for this opera by the husband and
wife artistic team of composer John Harris and writer/director Zinnie
Harris based on Zinnie Harris' short play of the same name. Originally
commissioned by the Sound festival in Aberdeen, The Garden is a gentle
tale of love and hope in a high-rise flat during the last days of the
world.

The Slab Boys - February 12-March 7
When John Byrne's tale of a couple of work-shy Paisley teddy boys with
ambitions beyond the factory floor first appeared in 1978 at the
Traverse Theatre in Edinburgh, its mix of baroque banter and working
class experience redefined what was possible on the Scottish stage. At
the directorial helm was actor David Hayman, who revisits the play in
this new production in which he also appears.

Long Live The Little Knife – February 24-28
David Leddy's play about art, forgery and castration is revived by
Leddy's Fire Exit company for the Circle Studio, as a pair of
small-time con artists attempt to become the world's greatest
counterfeiters, despite their very obvious lack of skills with a
paintbrush.

The Absence of War  - March 31-April 3
David Hare's 1993 play was the final part of a trilogy that looked at
the powers behind the British state. Where Racing Demons examined the
church and Murmuring Judges law and order, The Absence of War inspired
by the defeat of the Labour Party in the UK General Election a year
earlier. Headlong's new production following visits to the Citz with
Medea, The Seagull and 1984 brings the play to Scotland for the first
time at what is a crucial time for the Labour Party on both sides of
the border.

Lippy - April 8-11
Bush Markouzal's Herald Angel winning Edinburgh hit may have drawn
inspiration from the deaths of three women who starved themselves to
death, but the Dead Centre theatre company's production is no social
document. Rather, the play's explosion of forms questions notions of
how you tell other people's stories. The show's Glasgow dates also mark
the Citz's first collaboration with the Arches Behaviour Festival

Fever Dream: Southside - April 23-May 9
Douglas Maxwell's first new play for some time is set in Glasgow's
Govanhill district, where bringing up children in a neighbourhood awash
with unique characters make for a surreal comic thriller that looks at
the vagaries of community spirit and city life. Dominic Hill directs.

Into That Darkness - May 18-30
Former Citz director Robert David Macdonald's adaptation of journalist
Gitta Sereny's book based on sixty hours of interviews with  Franz
Stangl, the commandant of the Treblinka and Sobibor extermination
camps, was first seen in the 1990s. The original production featured
Macdonald as Stangl, who acted opposite Roberta Taylor who recently
played Gertrude in Dominic Hill's production of Hamlet. This new
production is overseen by the theatre's Main Stage Director in
Residence, Gareth Nicholls.

The Herald, October 28th 2014


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The Drawer Boy

Paisley Arts Centre
Four stars
When self-absorbed actor Miles turns up at an isolated farmhouse in
search of a story, he gets more than he bargained for when he's taken
in by Morgan and Angus who live there.  Both Second World War veterans,
these life-long friends play out their lives in early 1970s Ontario,
working the land as they keep old and uncomfortable memories at bay.
Miles' arrival awakens something in a damaged Angus that can't be
placated anymore by baking bread, counting stars and listening to
Morgan's possibly unreliable tales of how they got to where they are.

Inspired by real-life events that led to The Farm Show, a defining
moment in Canadian theatre,  Michael Healey's 1999 play taps into a
rich seam of dramatic and social history even as it pokes fun at the
try-too-hard earnestness that springs from Miles and his big city ways.
Out of this comes a tender meditation on how stories can enlighten even
the most shattered minds.

Alasdair McCrone's touring revival for Mull Theatre captures the full
heart and soul of Healey's drama with an understated sense of the
play's intimacy. Much of this is down to how the interplay between each
character is realised, something which McCrone's cast rise to with
aplomb. Barrie Hunter's stoic Morgan is offset beautifully by James
Mackenzie's wide-eyed Miles, while McCrone himself plays Angus with a
wounded sensitivity that is loveable without ever falling prey to
cutesiness.

As the show's tour continues with dates in Dundee tonight, Greenock
tomorrow and beyond, McCrone and co have captured the full poignancy of
how sometimes the truth can come out in very mysterious ways.

The Herald, October 28th 2014


ends

The Gamblers

Dundee Rep
Four stars
Ever feel like you've been cheated? John Lydon's famous phrase springs
to mind in Selma Dimitrijevic's production of her new version of
Gogol's nineteenth century comedy, penned here with Mikhail Durnenkov.
This isn't just because of the Sex Pistols t-shirt sported by one of
the key players in the elaborate sting that follows from an unholy
alliance between con-men. It is the way too that Dimitrijevic and her
all-female ensemble play with artifice and gender in a way that itself
is a stylistic gamble. Yet, as each character enters the locker-room to
play macho games, it pays dividends even as the gang hustle their
victim into suspending their own disbelief.

Initially nothing is hidden in this co-production between Greyscale and
Dundee Rep Ensemble in association with Northern Stage and Stellar
Quines. Once the sextet of players have put on charity shop suits and
waistcoats, they pick up instruments to become a junkyard dance-band
before a playground whistle calls them to attention. Everything from
thereon in is an elaborate game, as each adopt the exaggerated
mannerisms of lads on a stag do, attempting to out-drink, out-swagger
and out-smart one another with increasingly ridiculous effect.

Having women put on the fragile mask of machismo in such a way not only
heightens the comedy of what might well be a template for every
big-screen depiction of hustlers ever made. With a cast of six
featuring Amanda Hadingue as newcomer Iharev, Hannah McPake as leader
of the crew Uteshitelny and the Rep Ensemble's Emily Winter as the wily
Shvohnev, it also makes for a piece of gender-bending subversion that
double-bluffs its way onto the stage with barely a trick missed.

The Herald, October 28th 2014


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Monday, 27 October 2014

Bondagers

Royal Lyceum Theatre, Edinburgh
Four stars
Five women emerge from the blackness of Jamie Vartan's panoramic
staging at the start of Lu Kemp's revival of Sue Glover's 1991 play,
each dragging a wooden crate attached to a rope behind them. Resembling
a quintet of Mother Courages, this is just one of many powerful images
in Glover's brutal and unsentimental study of life across the seasons
for six women working the land  in nineteenth century rural Scotland.

Hired by the gentry and paid a pittance, youngsters Liza and Jenny line
up alongside Sara and her teenage daughter Tottie. Maggie works
alongside them inbetween tending to her bairns, while ex Bondager Ellen
occasionally loosens her corset and comes down from the big house she
married into. All have yearnings, be it for Canada or a local
farm-hand, and when work turns to play, Tottie's tragedy is inevitable.

After more than a decade without a production on home soil, one of the
most striking things about Bondagers is just how ground-breaking the
play's fusion of rich poetic text, striking physicality and a rhythmic
musicality that pulses it remains. Yet so connected are its mixture of
forms and styles in Kemp's rendering of the play that it never draws
attention to them, even as Michael John McCarthy's score seems to
whisper from the land itself.

Among six dynamic performances, Cath Whitefield gives a heart-rending
turn as Tottie, here more a free spirit without any social buffers to
contain her than a one-dimensional daftie. Tottie is the play's heart,
in which something deeply and profoundly primal is going on. This
speaks volumes about how both women and the environment they tend to
can be violated by men's hands.

The Herald, October 27th 2014


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Friday, 24 October 2014

The King's Peace: Realism and War

Stills, Edinburgh until Sunday.

Four stars

While the welter of artistic contributions to the one hundred year anniversary of the First World War's opening salvo have been resolutely non-triumphalist, recent events in Palestine and what looks set to be Iraq Part Three suggest little has been learnt in the intervening century. As Remembrance Day looms, this is where this dense and at times overwhelming compendium of war in pieces curated by artist Owen Logan and Kirsten Lloyd of Stills comes in.

A sequel of sorts to Logan and Lloyd's previous collaboration on the epic ECONOMY project, which looked at global capitalism in a similarly polemical fashion, the starting point of The King's Peace is selections from Masquerade: Michael Jackson Alive in Nigeria (2001-2005). Logan's satirical photo-essay sees him pick up the mantle – and the white mask – of the late pop icon and travels to Africa, where his mysterious collaborators the Maverick Ejiogbe Twins subsequently play-act assorted personas that move from self-deified guru through the echelons of a volatile society in flux.

Set against walls painted perfectly regimented red or white which host pithy quotes from Emmeline Pankhurst and others, Masquerade becomes the mast for an umbilically and socio-politically connected network of images from the USA, South Africa, Argentina, Italy and much closer to where the home fires may have burnt to be pinned to. The roots of this come in archive spreads from 1920s radical newspaper, Workers' Illustrated News, and The Greatest Show on Earth, from the 1930s. The now vintage imagery of both make explicit the economic relationship between capitalism and war.

The collateral damage of conflict can be seen both in Philip Jones Griffiths' remarkable frontline images collected in his 1971 book, Vietnam Inc (1971), and in the post Second World War shots of Paul Strand, who, along with writer Cesare Zavattini, produced Un Paese: Portrait of an Italian Village (1955) out of time spent in the rural town of Luzzara. While American soldiers observe Vietnamese mothers holding their dead children in the former, the dusty family idyll of the latter is upended by the words beside it from the mother of a clan decimated by violence.

On a wooden assemblage that resembles a wind-up washing line, but which is actually a reconstruction of a design first built by Latvian artist Gustav Klucis to host a living newspaper type structure, an archive of the 1960s Argentinian collective, Grupo de Artistas de Vanguardia Group of Avant-Garde Artists) is plastered. Archivo Tucuman Arde (Tucuman Burns Archive) (1968) is a series of posters and other documentation of a doomed attempt at alternative media which was eventually shut down by the authorities it opposed in a climate of social crisis in a US-backed dictatorship.

War Primer 2 (2011) finds Adam Broomberg and Oliver Chanarin applying similarly disruptive strategies to Realpolitik by putting contemporary images over clippings collected by Bertolt Brecht in 1955 and accompanied by poems which are as pertinent now as then. One, in which American troops film a dead body with a camouflage covered video phone is especially telling of how war is immortalised as spectacle.

This is evident too in the selections of photo-montages from Martha Rosler's House Beautiful: Bringing The War Home, New Series (2004-2008). Here male models who seem to have stepped out of a Reservoir Dogs theme party promenade through a battlefield. In another, a chicly-dressed female model gazes with mouth wide open into her mobile phone as if about to take a selfie.

Blithely self-absorbed and seemingly unaware of the two bloodied children slumped in the chairs behind her, the woman registers posed faux surprise at the image of the man possibly caught in the crossfire on the small screen in her hand as what may as well be a downloaded action movie. Sheltered from the blast of the carnage outside the windows of her sleekly sound-proofed des-res, the woman's response, in all it's glossy vacuity, is an all too perfect encapsulation of desensitised lives during wartime.

Nermine Hammam's Press, from her series, Unfolding (2012), is a brutal juxtaposition of police brutality in Egypt following the 2011 uprising and the Zen serenity of a Japanese medieval landscape that makes it look like a frame from a science-fiction comic strip.

If the two images from Fred Lonidier's N.A.F.T.A. (Not A Fair Trade for All) series (2005) highlights the relationship between art and activism among exploited workers in Mexico, it is made even clearer in Digging for Diamonds...a Journey Back to Fairy Hales (1994/2014). This film charts the interventions of the Snapcorps photography group, based in the Wester Hailes area of Edinburgh in the 1990s. Here the group dressed up as an unemployed Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs for Hi Ho Giro, a piece that was part performance, part protest.

Through a series of reminiscences of four of the original Snapcorps members, the film made with Stuart Platt captures a moment from Edinburgh's oppositional past that created a mini community who discovered their own brand of self-determination and power through a piece of serious fun.

With books and essays in a newspaper style publication to read and films, including Eugene Jarecki's ninety-eight minute Why We Fight to watch, there's a lot to take in throughout what becomes a quietly didactic meditation on war's ongoing futility.

That intensity of concentration required may be partly why The King's Peace perhaps hasn't attracted the same amount of attention as the more voguishly marketable sections of GENERATION, the showcase of twenty-five years of contemporary art in Scotland which it forms part of. It's almost as if the show has been declared a no-man's-land, too serious and too engaged to make the front pages alongside the assorted art stars featured elsewhere in GENERATION. While this is a shame, it is also everything that The King's Peace is about. All it is saying, after all, is give peace a chance, and who would want to read about that?
 
A shorter version of this article appeared on The List online, October 2014
 

ends

Talk To Me Like the Rain and Let Me Listen...

Little Theatre, Dundee
Four stars
A quartet of rarely-seen short plays by Tennessee Williams isn't the
obvious choice for Dundee Rep Ensemble's fifth annual tour of the
city's community venues. In director Irene Macdougall's hands, however,
Williams' sad little studies of little lives in everyday crisis are
revealed to be as rich in poetry and poignancy as his tempestuous
full-length works.

Opening with the compendium's title piece, the self-destructive urges
of the play's damaged young couple played by Thomas Cotran and Millie
Turner are captured in a series of desperate exchanges that sees them
finally cling to each other for comfort. Like them, all of Williams'
characters create elaborate fictions for themselves in order to survive
the madness of the world beyond the bare floorboards and shabby rooms
of Leila Kalbassi's set. Punctuated by a melancholy piano score, the
plays contain a contemporary currency too that speaks variously about
art, addiction and abuse.

In Mr Paradise, Turner's literary groupie comes calling on John Buick's
clapped-out poet who she wishes to reintroduce to the world. Auto-da-Fe
finds the sight of a dirty picture opening something up inside pious
Eloi he's unable to contain, even as his mother, played by Ann Louise
Ross, looks on with disapproval. Cotran and Turner fully come into
their own in This Property is Condemned as Tom and Willie, a pair of
teenagers playing on the rail-track. Dressed in a vivid purple dress
and spinning increasingly troubling yarns as she clutches on to her
doll, Turner gives a performance that is as truthful as it is grotesque
in an emotionally charged evening of miniature masterpieces.

The Herald, October 24th 2014


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Tuesday, 21 October 2014

Sue Glover - Bondagers

Before Sue Glover wrote Bondagers, books on the subject of female farm
workers in the nineteenth century seemed to be pretty thin on the
ground. Once Glover's play charting six women's travails through the
seasons became a hit in Ian Brown's original production for the
Traverse Theatre in 1991, however, everything changed. The play's
emotional landscape and lyrical largesse tapped into something that
audiences lapped up, and Brown's production was revived for bigger
theatres and toured to Canada. Suddenly there seemed to be a welter of
literature on the subject, while the play itself was recently named as
one of the twelve key Scottish plays written between 1970 and 2010.

Twenty-three years on since its premiere, and more than a decade since
it was last produced on home soil, Bondagers comes home to roost in Lu
Kemp's new production at the Royal Lyceum Theatre in Edinburgh. Even
with such an extended absence, Glover remains close to the play.

“It's difficult to get away from it,” she says on a lunchtime sojourn
into Edinburgh from her Fife home. “It's always there. There have been
productions abroad, you get emails from students doing design, or
school-teachers doing it with their kids, so it becomes part of you.
All your plays are part of you.”

The roots of Bondagers date back to Glover being told about the history
of women who were exploited as cheap labour while trying to keep body,
soul and family together. Having never heard of them, she looked into
it, and originally planned to write the play as a two-hander before it
blossomed into something bigger.

“Ian Brown said to me that I'd given him a very difficult play to
direct,” Glover remembers. “Apparently it's written in a lot of
different styles, but they all seem to fit together to me, and I don't
want to analyse or think about that too much, but I think it was just
the landscape that started it, and it's very dangerous to begin with a
landscape. It's usually a character or something of the story or an
incident, but there wasn't anything except that I kept seeing these
misty fields. A forty or fifty acre field sounds enormous, and it was
enormous then, although it's nothing now. I was on a car and a train in
Poland recently, going past these vast swathes of fields that could
have been somewhere in America, but these fields were new at that time.

“I believe they tried growing trees around the edges of the fields, and
then realised that it wasn't a good idea, partly because it would keep
the sun off the fields. I loved all that stuff. I always have. Even as
a kid I'd see places being concreted over, and wonder how we'd be able
to grow our food.”

Before Bondagers, there seemed to be few contemporary plays being
written in Scotland with rural settings. Whether it was coincidence or
there was something in the air, Glover's play seemed to open the door
on other works that moved beyond the inner-city. Alastair Cording's
stage adaptation of Lewis Grassic Gibbons' novel, Sunset Song, appeared
the same year as Bondagers, while original works such as David
Harrower's still startling Knives In Hens was an even bigger breath of
fresh air. At one point, it seemed like the majority of new plays being
produced by the Traverse were rural-based, including Glover's own play,
Shetland Saga. This was something brought home by the new writing
theatre's once annual Highland tour.

“I got the impression that if I'd been writing about housing estates or
factories or drugs, some theatres might have been much more interested
in my work,” Glover says. “All of my theatre plays are set on beaches
or islands or the countryside, and audiences have always been very
happy about that. Theatre admin departments weren't, certainly not in
the way they are now.”

One of Glover's bĂȘte noirs is classical plays having some kind of
concept imposed on them.

“They keep on trying to see the relevance of everything,” she says,
“but audiences will get the relevance of it. I don't want to see
Shakespeare done in blazers with people carrying tennis rackets.
Audiences aren't so dim that they can't see what a play is about.”

Kemp's revival of Bondagers for the Royal Lyceum heralds a mini
renaissance of Glover's work. A new production by Borderline Theatre
Company of The Straw Chair, first seen at the Traverse in 1988, is
scheduled for 2015. Like Bondagers, The Straw Chair looks to history
for inspiration, and looks at what happens when an Edinburgh minister
and his wife arrive on eighteenth century St Kilda.

“It's set in the past,” says Glover of the play she calls her favourite
work, “but really it's a play about marriage. It's really exciting,
because they're going to open it in Orkney.”

Glover's most recent full-length stage play was Marilyn, which imagined
a meeting between Marilyn Monroe and Simone Signoret in a hotel room,
and which was seen at the Citizens Theatre in 2011. Beyond that, Glover
currently has two short plays on the go. The first is based around a
couple living with lions, while the second is about an older couple
facing up to their own mortality.
As with Bondagers, however, Glover is unwilling to impose a theme on
her new works lest it get in the way of writing it.

“I found out what Bondagers is about while I was writing it,” she says.
“It's about losing or spoiling the land. Young people are slightly
horrified by the sexual politics in the play, because they're seeing it
through modern eyes, but the energy of these women was amazing.”

Bondagers, Royal Lyceum Theatre, Edinburgh, October 22-November 15.
www.lyceum.org.uk

ends

Sue Glover – A life in writing

Sue Glover was born in Edinburgh and lives in the East Neuk of Fife.

She has written for theatre television and radio.

The Seal Wife – Based on the legend of the selkies – seals who take
human form and live on the land – Glover reinvented the myth for a
fishing community in 1980 at the Little Lyceum in Edinburgh.

The Straw Chair – First presented at the Traverse Theatre in 1988, this
charts the travails of an Edinburgh minister and his wife when they
move to St Kilda. A hit at the time, The Straw Chair looks set to be
revived by Borderline Theatre Company in 2015.

Bondagers – Glover's best known play was first presented by the
Traverse in 1991, when it opened at Tramway in Glasgow. Ian Brown's
production was subsequently remounted three times, and toured to Canada.

Sacred Hearts – This tale of five prostitutes who occupy the local
church in protest at their working conditions was based on a real life
prostitutes strike in 1975, and was presented by Communicado Theatre
company in 1994.

Shetland Saga – Philip Howard directed Glover's tale of what happens to
a group of Bulgarian sailors who become stranded in Shetland at the
Traverse Theatre in 2000.

Marilyn – Howard again directed Glover's work in this reimagining of a
meeting between Marilyn Monroe and Simone Signoret, who find themselves
staying at the same hotel.

The Herald, October 21st 2014


ends